As informações e opiniões formadas neste blog são de responsabilidade única do autor.

Na revista do "New York Times": "The Moral Life of Babies"

Ricardo Lombardi

08 de maio de 2010 | 12h17

bebes

Boa reportagem de Paul Bloom na nova edição da revista do New York Times, que circula com a edição de domingo: “The Moral Life of Babies — Can they really tell right from wrong? What researchers are cooing about“. Um trecho:

“Like many scientists and humanists, I have long been fascinated by the capacities and inclinations of babies and children. The mental life of young humans not only is an interesting topic in its own right; it also raises — and can help answer — fundamental questions of philosophy and psychology, including how biological evolution and cultural experience conspire to shape human nature. In graduate school, I studied early language development and later moved on to fairly traditional topics in cognitive development, like how we come to understand the minds of other people — what they know, want and experience.

But the current work I’m involved in, on baby morality, might seem like a perverse and misguided next step. Why would anyone even entertain the thought of babies as moral beings? From Sigmund Freud to Jean Piaget to Lawrence Kohlberg, psychologists have long argued that we begin life as amoral animals. One important task of society, particularly of parents, is to turn babies into civilized beings — social creatures who can experience empathy, guilt and shame; who can override selfish impulses in the name of higher principles; and who will respond with outrage to unfairness and injustice. Many parents and educators would endorse a view of infants and toddlers close to that of a recent Onion headline: “New Study Reveals Most Children Unrepentant Sociopaths.” If children enter the world already equipped with moral notions, why is it that we have to work so hard to humanize them?”

Comentários

Os comentários são exclusivos para assinantes do Estadão.

Tendências: