Na "New Yorker", David Remnick trabalha duro para parecer que não está trabalhando duro
As informações e opiniões formadas neste blog são de responsabilidade única do autor.

Na "New Yorker", David Remnick trabalha duro para parecer que não está trabalhando duro

Ricardo Lombardi

06 de abril de 2010 | 12h12

05remnick_CA0-popup

The Bridge“, o novo livro de David Remnick (foto), diretor de redação da New Yorker, chega hoje às livrarias dos Estados Unidos (é uma biografia de 672 páginas do presidente Obama).  O New York Times fez uma matéria sobre Remnick e diz que, na redação da New Yorker, ele trabalha duro para parecer que não estrá trabalhando duro. Um trecho da matéria que fala sobre o cotidiano dele na revista, no original:

“He likes to pretend that there’s no sweat,” said Malcolm Gladwell, a New Yorker staff writer and an old colleague from The Washington Post. “He cruises around and chats with people and then disappears and writes thousands of words in 15 minutes. It’s all part of that ‘making it look easy’ thing.”

It’s hard to make running any magazine, even The New Yorker, look easy these days. Last year, the magazine’s ad pages fell 24 percent, a little less than the industry average. But Mr. Remnick managed to eke out a small operating profit (excluding corporate overhead charges) by cutting costs, as he had for years.

Those cuts meant that The New Yorker was the only Condé Nast magazine to avoid budget cuts last year, earning Mr. Remnick the reputation of a teacher’s pet within the company, where voluntary cuts usually amount to ordering a magnum of Champagne instead of a jeroboam.”